Grubby Paws - For Your Pets Healthy Eating

The Anatomy of Eating

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As a faithful companion to humans for some 10,000 years, the trend to humanize our companion dogs comes as no surprise. Yet despite his long and close association with humans, the dog remains closest genetically to the gray wolf, with whom he shares over 99% of his mitochondrial DNA. The close genetic relationship between dog and wolf led the Smithsonian Institution to reclassify the dog from its previous separate species designation of Canis familiaris to Canis lupus familiaris.

As a faithful companion to humans for some 10,000 years, the trend to humanize our companion dogs comes as no surprise. Yet despite his long and close association with humans, the dog remains closest genetically to the gray wolf, with whom he shares over 99% of his mitochondrial DNA. The close genetic relationship between dog and wolf led the Smithsonian Institution to reclassify the dog from its previous separate species designation of Canis familiaris to Canis lupus familiaris.

In other words, the Timber wolf, the Tundra wolf, and our beloved companion dog, all fall under the genetic umbrella of the gray wolf: Canis lupus.1 Just like wolves, all dogs are evolved as carnivores, with anatomical features that clearly adapt them for meat-based diets. Understanding the anatomical differences between carnivores, omnivores and herbivores helps understand why dogs and cats are classified as carnivores, and what foods best match their anatomy.

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